Full Text Canadian Political Transcripts October 19, 2015: Justin Trudeau’s victory speech election night after leading the Liberals to a majority government transcript

CANADIAN POLITICAL TRANSCRIPTS

POLITICAL HEADLINES:

Transcript of Justin Trudeau’s victory speech after leading the Liberals to a majority

Source: macleans.ca, 10-19-15

Liberal leader Justin Trudeau waves to the crowd after his speech at Liberal election headquarters in Montreal, Que. on Monday, October 20, 2015. (Sean Kilpatrick/CP)

Liberal leader Justin Trudeau waves to the crowd after his speech at Liberal election headquarters in Montreal, Que. on Monday, October 20, 2015. (Sean Kilpatrick/CP)

Liberal leader Justin Trudeau waves to the crowd after his speech at Liberal election headquarters in Montreal, Que. on Monday, October 20, 2015. (Sean Kilpatrick/CP)

After leading his Liberals to a majority government, Justin Trudeau gave the following speech in Montreal. French is in italics.

Merci. Merci. Thank you. Thank you, my friends. Merci. Merci, mes amis. Thank you. Thank you, my friends. Yes.

Il y a – il y a plus de 100 ans, un grand Premier ministre, Wilfrid Laurier, a parlé des voies ensoleillées. Il savait que la politique peut être une force positive, et c’est le message que les Canadiens ont envoyé aujourd’hui. Les Canadiens ont choisi le changement, un vrai changement.

Sunny ways, my friends, sunny ways. This is what positive politics can do. This is what a causative, hopeful – a hopeful vision and a platform and a team together can make happen. Canadians – Canadians from all across this great country sent a clear message tonight. It’s time for a change in this country, my friends, a real change.

Il y a tellement de gens à remercier ce soir et je vais passer beaucoup de temps dans les jours à venir à les remercier, mais je veux commencer par ma famille. J’aimerais, d’abord, remercier ma famille — Sophie, Xavier, Ella-Grace et Hadrien. Merci de m’avoir permis de servir. Merci, Sophie, pour ta force, pour ta compassion, pour ta grandeur d’âme et pour ta générosité profonde. Et à Xavier, Ella-Grace et Hadrien qui font dodo maintenant mais qui seront avec nous demain matin, mes enfants, on embarque dans une nouvelle aventure ensemble et je peux vous dire maintenant qu’il va avoir des moments difficiles pour vous en tant qu’enfants de Premier ministre, mais papa sera là pour vous, comme vous savez bien.

Je veux aussi remercier les gens qui me font confiance depuis 2008 — les gens de Papineau. Merci encore une fois de votre appui. Merci de votre confiance. Je serais, d’abord et avant tout, fier de vous représenter à la Chambre des communes. Vous, mes chers concitoyens de Papineau, vous m’aviez parlé des enjeux qui sont importants pour vous. Je vous ai entendus et cela m’a aidé à devenir un meilleur député, à devenir un meilleur chef, et cela va m’aider à devenir un meilleur Premier ministre. Merci.

I also want to specifically thank my good friends Katie Telford and Gerald Butts. Katie and Gerry are two of the smartest, toughest, hardest working people you will find anywhere. They share with me the conviction that politics doesn’t have to be negative and personal to be successful, that – that you can appeal to the better angels of our nature, and you can win while doing it.

Tonight, my very good friends, we proved that. I hope it is an inspiration to like-minded people to step up and pitch in, to get involved in the public life of this country and to know that a positive, optimistic, hopeful vision of public life isn’t a naive dream; it can be a powerful force for change.

And I also want to thank the incredible volunteers that made tonight happen. Over 80,000 Canadians got involved in the core of this campaign. They knocked on their neighbours’ doors. They made phone calls. They sent emails. Hundreds of thousands more supported us actively with their friends and online. They convinced their neighbours and their families. And all of these people had one thing in common: they care deeply about their families, their communities and their country. They believe that better is possible and that active citizens can play a real part in making it happen.

Now this movement we’ve built was fuelled by these amazing volunteers, and from the bottom of my heart, I thank you.

Now I want to take a moment to speak about my colleagues across the aisle. Tonight, I received phone calls from all of them, including from Mr. Harper. Stephen Harper has served this country for a decade, and as with anyone who has devoted their life to this country, we thank him for his service.

Now over the course of this campaign, I had the opportunity to have a couple of brief personal conversations with him about our families. It reminded me of the extraordinary and unique sacrifices that are made by anybody who serves this country at the highest levels, and I want to remind everyone, as I’ve said many times over the course of this campaign: Conservatives are not our enemies, they’re our neighbours. Leadership is about bringing people of all different perspectives together.

Je veux aussi rendre hommage à Thomas Mulcair qui a mené une campagne vigoureuse. Il s’est battu jusqu’à la fin. Aux militants de son parti, je comprends votre déception ce soir. Notre parti a vécu des moments difficiles il y a pas si longtemps. Alors ne vous découragez pas. Notre pays a besoin de citoyens engagés comme vous. Notre pays en sera plus fort. Merci.

Now you’re all going to hear a lot tonight and tomorrow about me and about our campaign. Lots of people are going to have lots of opinions about why we were successful. Well, for three years, we had a very old-fashioned strategy. We met with and talked with as many Canadians as we could, and we listened. We won this election because we listened. We did the hard work of slogging it across the country. We met with hundreds of people in the dead of winter in the Arctic and with thousands of people in Brampton in the middle of this campaign.

You built this platform. You built this movement. You told us what you need to be successful. You told us what kind of government you want, and we built the plan to make it happen. In coffee shops and in town halls, in church basements and in gurdwaras you gathered. You spent time together with us, and you told us about the kind of country you want to build and leave to your children.

Vous nous avez fait part de vos défis dans votre vie de tous les jours. Vous nous avez dit que ça devenait de plus en plus difficile de joindre les deux bouts et de payer les factures à la fin du mois. Vous nous avez dit que vous étiez inquiets pour votre retraite. Vous nous avez dit que vos communautés avaient besoin d’investissement. Vous nous avez dit que les bons emplois se faisaient de plus en plus rares. Vous êtes l’inspiration derrière notre programme. Vous êtes la raison pour laquelle nous avons travaillé si fort pour nous rendre là où nous sommes ce soir. Et vous serez toujours au coeur du gouvernement que nous allons former.

Over the past three years, you told us what you’re going through. You told us that it’s getting harder and harder to make ends meet, let alone to get ahead. You told us you’re worried about whether you’ll be able to afford a dignified retirement. You told us that your communities need investment. You told us you need a fair shot at better jobs. You are the inspiration for our efforts. You are the reason why we worked so hard to be here tonight, and you will be at the heart of this new government.

So my message to you tonight, my fellow citizens, is simple: have faith in yourselves and in your country. Know that we can make anything happen if we set our minds to it and work hard.

Ce n’est pas moi qui a fait l’histoire ce soir, c’est vous. Ne laissez pas les gens vous dire le contraire. Je sais que je suis ici ce soir pour une seule raison : parce que vous m’avez choisi.

I didn’t make history tonight; you did. And don’t let anyone tell you any differently. I know that I am on stage tonight for one reason and one reason only: because you put me here. And you gave me clear marching orders. You want a government that works as hard as you do, one that is focussed every minute of every day on growing the economy, creating jobs and strengthening the middle class, one that is devoted to helping less fortunate Canadian families work their way into the middle class.

You want a Prime Minister who knows Canada is a country strong, not in spite of our differences, but because of them, a PM who never seeks to divide Canadians, but takes every single opportunity to bring us together. You want a Prime Minister who knows that if Canadians are to trust their government, their government needs to trust Canadians, a PM who understands that openness and transparency means better, smarter decisions. You want a Prime Minister that knows that a renewed nation-to-nation relationship with indigenous peoples that respects rights and honours treaties must be the basis for how we work to close the gap and walk forward together.

À mes compatriotes québécois, ce soir, ensemble, nous avons choisi la voie de l’engagement. Nous avons choisi de se réengager dans une politique plus rassembleuse, plus positive. Nous avons choisi de se réengager dans la gouverne d’un pays pour qui reflète nos valeurs et nos ambitions. Nous avons choisi de faire confiance et d’investir ensemble dans notre avenir.

Au cours des trois dernières années, j’ai passé beaucoup de temps à aller à votre rencontre et à vous écouter. Vous m’aviez dit que vous vouliez un gouvernement ouvert et transparent, un gouvernement qui fait confiance en ses citoyens, un gouvernement au service de tous les Canadiens et les Canadiennes. Ce soir, c’est l’engagement que je prends devant vous : je serai le Premier ministre de tous les Canadiens. Nous formerons un gouvernement intègre qui respectera les institutions et qui fera de la collaboration avec les provinces le principe premier de ses actions.

Chers amis québécois, merci. Ce soir, le Canada retrouve un peu de lui-même. Ce soir, le Québec fait un véritable retour au gouvernement du Canada.

Canadians – Canadians have spoken. You want a government with a vision and an agenda for this country that is positive and ambitious and hopeful. Well, my friends, I promise you tonight that I will lead that government. I will make that vision a reality. I will be that Prime Minister.

In this election, 1,792 Canadians stepped up, put their names on ballots and on lawn signs and ran for office. Three hundred and thirty-eight of them were chosen by you to be their voices in Ottawa, and I pledge tonight that I will listen to all of them.

There are a thousand stories I could share with you about this remarkable campaign, but I want you to think about one in particular. Last week, I met a young mom in St. Catharines, Ontario. She practises the Muslim faith and was wearing a hijab. She made her way through the crowd and handed me her infant daughter, and as she leaned forward, she said something that I will never forget. She said she’s voting for us because she wants to make sure that her little girl has the right to make her own choices in life and that our government will protect those rights.

To her I say this: you and your fellow citizens have chosen a new government, a government that believes deeply in the diversity of our country. We know in our bones that Canada was built by people from all corners of the world who worship every faith, who belong to every culture, who speak every language.

We believe in our hearts that this country’s unique diversity is a blessing bestowed upon us by previous generations of Canadians, Canadians who stared down prejudice and fought discrimination in all its forms. We know that our enviable, inclusive society didn’t happen by accident and won’t continue without effort. I have always known this; Canadians know it too. If not, I might have spoken earlier this evening and given a very different speech.

Have faith in your fellow citizens, my friends. They are kind and generous. They are open-minded and optimistic. And they know in their heart of hearts that a Canadian is a Canadian is a Canadian.

Mes amis, nous avons battu la peur avec l’espoir. Nous avons battu le cynisme avec le travail acharné. Nous avons battu la politique négative avec une vision rassembleuse et positive.

My friends, we beat fear with hope. We beat cynicism with hard work. We beat negative, divisive politics with a positive vision that brings Canadians together. Most of all, we defeated the idea that Canadians should be satisfied with less, that good enough is good enough and that better just isn’t possible. Well, my friends, this is Canada, and in Canada better is always possible.

Thank you. Thank you very much.

Merci. Merci. Merci.

Full Text Political Transcripts February 20, 2014: Liberal Party Leader Justin Trudeau’s Speech at the Opening of the Liberal Biennial Convention

CANADIAN POLITICAL TRANSCRIPTS

POLITICAL HEADLINES

Speech by Liberal Party of Canada Leader, Justin Trudeau, in Montréal, QC

Posted on February 21, 2014
February 20, 2014

Source: Liberal Party, 2-21-14

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Welcome to my hometown.

Welcome to your hometown.

I was born a Montrealer in Ottawa.

Ottawa was because of my dad’s job, where he served his country. My brothers and I grew up in a house that wasn’t ours. The family was simply passing through Ottawa.

However, when we used to come to Montreal with my father, we could see that he felt at home.

Montreal was his real world. It was our home.

The idea of Montreal made us dream, in our burgeoning imagination as children, it had become a magical place.

And not just because in those days the Habs won the Stanley Cup.

So here I am, a few decades later, a Member of Parliament from Montreal, and it’s my turn to see my children grow up in Ottawa.

This is why I’m so proud to welcome you here tonight.

Each of us has a place called home. Each of us knows that a political commitment and public service starts in his local community.

We are all proud of our homes. We are all ready to justify how it’s important and special.

Let me talk to you about Montreal.

Montreal, the francophone metropolis of the Americas, where people from different origins, different cultures, and different religions came to settle, and where they have lived up to their challenge of succeeding, by coming together.

Make no mistake about it, in Canada, all our big cities have a wonderful diversity. In the Prairies, there are even small towns where there are more cultural communities than found in many countries.

Diversity makes us strong because it requires us to be kind. It requires courtesy, generosity of spirit. It means we have to understand one another.

It has made of Canadians a fair people.

I want Canadians from outside Quebec to know something. I know you worry about how divisions are being stoked in the province these days. How identity politics are generating fear and intolerance.

Well, have faith.

This idea that diversity is strength has never been a foreign idea here.

We first talked about this diversity here, in the St-Lawrence valley, in the French of the New World. From Samuel de Champlain to Georges-Étienne Cartier, from Wilfrid-Laurier to Pierre Trudeau, we have developed it, and we have shared it.

And, together, all across this great land, we made it into the idea of Canada.

To my fellow Quebecers, I say this: we have spent too long in protest. No wonder. For a decade, we have had a federal government that has no answers for the economic problems that feed fear and anxiety.

When progress stalls, fear moves forward. And fear can only be beaten back with hope.

There’s a man in the audience tonight who has fought for that idea as much as anyone ever has. A friend, a colleague, a mentor, an inspiration, a fellow Montrealer (and soon, a full time volunteer for the Liberal Party of Canada).

This will be Irwin Cotler’s last convention as a Member of Parliament. Please join me in thanking him for all he has done for his community, for his country, and for our shared values.

My friends, a year and a half ago, in the riding next to Irwin’s — my riding, Papineau, I kicked off my campaign to lead our party.

I launched the campaign on a simple, important idea. The idea we just heard Chrystia and Larry Summers wrestle with.  The idea I need you to focus on all weekend; that if we do not give everyone a real and fair chance to succeed, than we are not living up to this country’s basic premise.

You see we have a real problem. The middle class is in trouble. People haven’t had a real raise in 30 years, while inequality has increased, and household debt has exploded.

Those who practice the politics of division see in this an opportunity to exploit. An opportunity to sow fear and mistrust. To point fingers and lay blame.

It’s much easier to distract people from this problem, than it is to solve it.

People are susceptible to fearful, divisive messages when they are worried. Worried about their jobs, their debts, their retirement, their kids’ future.

Let’s be perfectly clear, in a rich and prosper economy, to force someone to choose between their religious principles and their employment, would be not only unacceptable, but simply inconceivable.

In a growing and fair economy, the Parti Québécois’ divisive plan would not only be unrealistic, it would be unthinkable.

But in the absence of a real and fair chance, fear and division can take root anywhere.

My friends. I have no interest in joining Mr. Harper and Mr. Mulcair in a competition to see who can make Canadians angrier.

And neither should you.

Last year, during our leadership campaign, together with my colleagues, we got hundreds of thousands of our fellow citizens interested in politics.

Many of them, for the first time.

Contrast that with Mr. Harper’s party. This month his Government introduced an Act in Parliament that would make it harder for Canadians to vote.

For me, the legislation can be summed up as this: the government will let you vote, if you insist.

But really, they’d rather you didn’t.

Mr. Harper’s party thinks that Canadians don’t care. That we won’t bother.

Look around you. Look at the new faces in this room. Look at all the people you have never met. Find strength in each other. Have faith in each other.

Together, we are going to prove them wrong.

Millions of Canadians, some watching tonight, are counting on us.

Let’s let them know: we won’t let you down.

We are gathering at a critical moment for our country.

The conversation we will have this weekend is particularly important.

While some people are trying to distract us from the key issues, I am asking you to stay on course. Let’s leave our opponents to continue worrying about our success, and we will worry about the success of Canadians.

I would ask you to look down the road at the big picture that presents itself in front of us, and to reflect on the country that we will be leaving to our children.

We are here to hope. We are to work hard. We are here to build. We are here put together the team and the plan to make this country better.

That’s why this weekend, in this city (my city), matters so very much.

After 8 long years, Canadians are tired of Mr. Harper’s party and of their negative approach to politics. Canadians are tired of the politics of fear and division.

But they don’t just want a different government. They want a better government. They want a government that is focused on making sure each and every Canadian has a real and fair chance at success.

We Liberals are going to build the team and the plan, and provide the leadership Canada needs to make it happen. Let’s be ambitious, not for ourselves, or for our party, but for our country.

My friends, we all have personal reasons for being here. People who are dear to us. Places that matter to us.

For me, there are three people in particular. Well, three for now. But really, really close to four… In fact, Sophie could give birth at any moment. Which is why, even though she really wanted to, she couldn’t be with us tonight.

In fact, if you don’t mind, I thought it’d be nice to give her a call.

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Liberal leader says Canadians are tired of what he calls fear and division sown by Harper govenment

Source: CBC, 2-20-14

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